How to Make a Slave Anklet

By Lynn Rademacher
Slave anklets can dress up your ankles when going barefoot.

Slave anklets are a way to decorate your ankles when not wearing any shoes. Slave anklets get their name from when they were ornamented with bells and worn by household slaves. The bells would ring as the slave walked, letting members of the household know where the slave was. Today slave anklets are worn as decoration and can be adorned with bells, gems or other decorative items.

Cut three strands of embroidery thread or three pieces of hemp twine to a length of 2 feet.

Position the ends of the string together and tie an overhand knot 1/4 of an inch from the end of the strings.

Tie another overhand knot 1/8 of an inch from the first knot.

Use an extra piece of string to determine the length needed to wrap around the ankle and down the top of the foot to the middle toe. Braid the three strands of thread that you knotted together previously until the braided portion matches the length of the string measurement. Tie an overhand knot at the end of the braided section to prevent the braid from unraveling.

Measure a 1/2-inch from the knot at the end of the braided section and tie another overhand knot. This will allow the thread that creates the toe ring to to lay flat and be more comfortable for the wearer.

Back braid the remaining length of the three strands through the previously braided section of thread to complete the loop for the toe ring portion of the slave anklet. Gently separate the braid with your fingers and thread the strings through the braid. This will make the braided section appear thicker and more decorative.

Tie an overhand knot in the string when you reach the end and cut off the excess string.

Wrap the braid around your ankle and insert the end with the toe ring between the two knots at the top of the braid to secure it around your ankle. Slip the toe ring loop over your middle toe and enjoy the decorative look.

About the Author

Lynn Rademacher started writing in 2001, covering technology, family and finance topics. Her writing has appeared in "Unique Magazine" and the "Ortonville Independent," among other publications. Rademacher holds a Bachelor of Arts in mass communication from South Dakota State University.