How to Make a Scrubby Out of Nylon Netting

By Suzie Faloon ; Updated September 15, 2017

Things Needed

  • 1 yard nylon netting
  • Sewing shears
  • I crochet hook

A scrubby is a slightly abrasive cleaning pad for the kitchen and bath. You can crochet a scrubby from strips of nylon netting which comes in individually packaged rolls or pieces sold by the yard. The netting fiber is found in floral or sewing sections of stores that sell fabric and craft supplies. You may even be able to purchase tulle netting from a florist. Use your hand-made scrubbers for cleaning the sink, cooking pans, dishes and the tub.

Cut the nylon netting into six, 2-inch-wide strips using sewing shears. Stack two strips of the netting and align the ends evenly. Wrap the ends around the end of your finger and roll them off creating a knot just as you would when knotting thread on a needle. Tie strips on the end until you have one long strip. Wrap the long strip around an empty thread spool or cardboard tube for ease of access and storage.

Secure one end of the strip onto an I hook. Make a chain of four stitches. Join the ends with a slip stitch to form a ring.

Make 10 single crochet stitches in the ring. Slip stitch to join the first and tenth stitches together. Chain two.

Make one single crochet in the first stitch. The chain two and the single crochet equals two single crochets. Make two single crochets in each stitch around. Slip stitch to join.

Make a two-stitch chain and one single crochet in the first stitch of this and all following rows. Make two single crochets in each stitch around the circle. Continue to make two single crochets in each stitch around the circle in each row until the scrubby is at the desired size.

Make a slip stitch in each stitch around the circumference of the scrubby to finish it. Make a chain of ten stitches at the base of the last slip stitch to make a hanger.

Slip stitch into the third slip stitch to the side of the chain to form the loop and secure it to the scrubby. Cut the nylon net strip at a length of three inches and weave it into the scrubby.

About the Author

Suzie Faloon is a freelance writer who has written online content for various websites. As a professional crafter and floral designer, Faloon owned a florist business for nearly 25 years. She completed the Institute of Children's Literature course in 1988.