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How to Make a Homemade Skee Ball Game Using Boxes

By Jeffery Keilholtz

Making a homemade skee ball game is a fun and interactive way to challenge a child's creative expression. Encourage a child to undertake the activity as an after-school or weekend project. Fitting three to five plastic containers into the top of a medium to large shipping box cardboard container represents the basic design of your skee ball game. Celebrate with your young artists by allowing them to play skee ball, using a ping pong or tennis ball, with friends and family.

Find a medium to large shipping box cardboard container with stable sides. Secure all sides together with packing tape.

Flip the box upside down. Set a large, empty plastic cottage cheese container atop the box at center. Slide the plastic container upwards so it is 1 inch below the top edge. Trace the base of the plastic container with a marker. Continue this process until there is a vertical line of three to five evenly spaced circular outlines.

Cut holes into the box along the trace lines with a utility knife. Set a large, empty and clean plastic cottage cheese container down into each hole. Bond the plastic containers into the holes with permanent epoxy.

Draw the number "10" onto a piece of 4-by-4-inch copy paper. Bond the paper to the outside of the lowest plastic container on the box with permanent epoxy. Write the number "10" into the bottom of the same container. Repeat this process three to five times to create additional scores that increase with every successive container.

Bond one of the 18-inch edges of an 18-by-24-inch shipping box cardboard sheet to the lower edge of the skee ball platform with permanent epoxy. Bond three 3-by-18-inch shipping box cardboard lips together with permanent epoxy. Bond the lip 3 inches below the top edge of the 18-by-24-inch sheet. The sheet and lip act as the panel upon which the ball will roll and skip upwards before falling into one of the containers.

Set the box up against the base of a wall at a 45-degree angle. Adjust the box so the panel is curved outward onto a flat surface. Roll a ping pong or tennis ball up the panel to begin the game.

About the Author

Jeffery Keilholtz began writing in 2002. He has worked professionally in the humanities and social sciences and is an expert in dramatic arts and professional politics. Keilholtz is published in publications such as Raw Story and Z-Magazine, and also pens political commentary under a pseudonym, Maryann Mann. He holds a dual Associate of Arts in psychology and sociology from Frederick Community College.