How to Make a Graph to Crochet

By Barbara Kellam-Scott ; Updated September 15, 2017

Things Needed

  • 14-count needlework graph paper
  • Pencil
Recreate a geometric pattern you like, such as in the lower portion of this bag, with a quick chart for filet crochet.

Filet crochet is one of the easiest, and yet most impressive, forms of the craft, drawing pictures of open and filled mesh squares. Chart your own design by referring to quilt patterns, simple charts for counted cross stitch, or any silhouette-style illustration. Be aware of scale — the pattern will almost always work up more coarsely than the chart — and understand that square geometrics will show better than flowing curves, and fairly isolated motifs better than those embedded in complex backgrounds. Start with a simple rectangular panel with a harlequin-style diamond pattern.

Count nine 10-square blocks along a short edge of the graph section of the paper. Mark Xs or dots to fill all 90 squares. Mark vertical borders, also nine blocks of 10 squares each, up from the ends of that first line. Fill in another row of squares inside the first lines. The three borders enclose a space 86 squares on each side.

Mark the square in either lower corner. Skip 20 squares across and mark again. Repeat across until you land in the opposite corner and mark that square.

Work up from each of the squares you marked in Step 2, marking another square out to each side on each row until the marks meet to make another solid line across (10 rows). There will be three squares in each point on the first row in this step (two squares at each side border), five in the next row (three), seven in the next (four), and so on.

Copy the row just below the solid line, leaving two open squares between the sets of filled ones. Continue to narrow each triangle of filled squares to match the lower halves of the diamonds. When you're down to single filled squares at the tops of the diamonds (10 rows), begin expanding the diamonds again as in Step 3.

Fill the space vertically with diamonds by repeating these steps, or simply follow the partial chart when you work the panel.

Tip

After you've finished this basic chart, you can enhance it by adding diamonds or other shapes inside the open diamonds, or open shapes, perhaps just outlines, within the solid ones. You might also add crossing lines, like the ones in argyle patterns, across the middles of both solid and open diamonds.

About the Author

Barbara Kellam-Scott has written since 1981 for print publications including "MassBay Antiques" and the award-winning corporate science magazine "Bellcore EXCHANGE." She writes as an advocate and lay Bible scholar in the Presbyterian Church. Kellam-Scott holds a Bachelor of Arts in intercultural studies from Ramapo College of New Jersey and conducted graduate work in sociology, theology and Biblical Hebrew.