How to Make a Fishnet

By Kyra Sheahan

Things Needed

  • Rope
  • Scissors
  • Net shuttles
  • Gauge stick
Fishnets can be made in a variety of colors.

A fishnet can be used to catch fish or it can be used as a decorative accent material for a home with a seaside theme. Fishnet is characterized by rope that intertwines to make a netting. The holes of a fishnet should not be large enough for the type of fish being caught to swim through, but different sizes of fishnet can be made to accommodate function or style. To make fishnet yourself, figure out the size rope you want to use and the dimensions for how long and wide the fishnet should be.

Cut pieces of the rope with scissors. You need equal lengths of the rope for each direction. Cut 10 pieces of rope that are each 3 feet long to go in the horizontal direction. Cut 10 pieces of rope that are each 4 feet long to go in the vertical direction. These measurements will give you a fishnet that is longer than it is wide.

Lay the pieces of rope down on a flat working surface. Place the horizontal pieces down first and set the vertical pieces on top of the horizontal ones. Space the rope evenly, approximately 1 inch apart, or bigger or smaller depending on how tight you want the fishnet to be.

Thread the rope into the net shuttle. The net shuttle is like a sewing needle for rope. It is used to create the small knots at the corners of every place where the fishnet intertwines, and help the netting maintain the fishnet pattern. Weave the net shuttle in and out of the intertwining rope, creating square-shaped holes in the netting.

Tie the ends of the net together so they come to a point. Loop the points through a gauge stick, which will hold the netting in place and keep it from unraveling. Use the gauge stick to hang the fishnet by or mold it into a portable net for fishing.

About the Author

Kyra Sheahan has been a writer for various publications since 2008. Her work has been featured in "The Desert Leaf" and "Kentucky Doc Magazine," covering health and wellness, environmental conservatism and DIY crafts. Sheahan holds an M.B.A. with an emphasis in finance.