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How to Make a Fake Tooth

You don't have to be a dentist to make a set of falsies.

Dressing up doesn't take place only on Halloween. Donning a new persona can happen all year-round, whether it be to perform on stage, ignite a few chuckles in others or even shoo away boredom. In fact, wearing flamboyant clothing or a wig are not the only ways to do so. Fake teeth not only spruce up a costume but also serve aesthetic purposes for some people whom have lost a real tooth.

Make a Tooth Using a Dental Cast

Cover your workspace with newspaper. Mix one cup of loose alginate powder and one cup water in a large bowl, sprinkling in the powder. Stir with a table knife until a yogurt-like consistency is achieved.

Tooth cast

Quickly pour the mixture into a dental impression plate. Put the plate into your mouth and bite down, avoiding the bottom of the plate to form an impression of your teeth in the alginate. Allow the excess to drip over the sink. Keep the device inside your mouth for three minutes. Open your mouth wide and remove it in a straight motion ensuring that it does not snag on any of your teeth.

Carefully separate the newly formed cast from the impression plate using a back-and-forth motion.

Plaster dental mold

Mix equal parts of water and dental plaster into a bowl using a plastic spoon. Pour mixture into the cast. Allow to set for an hour.

Remove the alginate and set it aside. Let the plaster dry for 10 minutes. Use a scalpel to shave off any excess plaster.

Sprinkle small amounts of the different shades of dental acrylic (to achieve the desired color) unto each tooth in the set of false teeth. Fill each tooth with a solvent using gloves.

Dip the plaster mold into clear liquid acrylic and remove promptly. Let dry at room temperature for 30 minutes.

Cut out the tooth that you want and polish it using a toothbrush.

Tip

Throw away unused plaster and alginate mixes into the trash can instead of the sink to avoid blockage.

Warning

As acrylic releases strong fumes, the use of a dust mask is recommended. Apply it in a well-ventilated room.

About the Author

Magdalene Ayuk began writing professionally in 2006. She has served as Voices editor for Dawson's student newspaper, snagged an internship with online magazine M.I.S.S., worked as a ghostwriter and written commentaries related to the black Montreal community for "Community Contact." Ayuk attended Concordia University where she earned a bachelor's degree in English literature with a minor in Spanish.