How to Make a Camisole

By Pat Olsen ; Updated September 15, 2017

Things Needed

  • Measuring tape
  • Dressmaker’s chalk
  • 1 yard stretch lace material
  • Sewing machine
  • Nylon thread
  • Strap turning tool.
  • 1-inch-wide silk ribbon
  • Pre-made rosebud embellishments

Camisoles are as much a fashion accessory as they are an undergarment. Today’s plunging necklines almost need a pretty camisole to prevent an X rating. They are simple to sew and can be finished in under an hour.

Measure all the way around your bust. Measure from your underarm to your waist.

Mark and cut out a rectangle from your fabric the circumference of your full bust measurement plus 1 inch and the length of your underarm to your waist plus 2 inches. This gives you the length and width of the rectangular single seam piece plus enough ease.

Use the zigzag stitch on your sewing machine. It is appropriate for seaming stretchy material. Right sides together, use a narrow zigzag stitch to close the back seam. This is the only seam this camisole needs. Trim the excess yardage close to the seam. Turn the top and bottom edges down 1/8" and zigzag stitch the raw edges down to form a narrow machine stitched hem.

Cut a 2x20-inch length of lace fabric. Right sides together, sew a seam the length of the fabric. Use a strap turning tool to turn the strap right side out. Cut the strap in half; mark and pin to the camisole placing each strap over the center of the breast across the shoulder to the back. Adjust the length of the straps to fit comfortably.

Iron the straps flat and stitch the silk ribbon in the center of each strap. Turn the raw ends under and sew to the marked front and back spots on the camisole. Make a small ribbon tie for each front side. Hand stitch a rosebud in the center of the ribbon, and hand stitch the embellished ribbon to the base of the front straps.

About the Author

Pat Olsen has over 35 years of experience as a professional journalist in California. She attended San Francisco State and Pacific College. Olsen has several published books, is a staff writer for Mill Creek Living Magazine, and currently writes for Demand Studio. She is a retired educator who still teaches twice a week.