How to Knit Leaves

By Amy Wilde
Knitted leaves are easy to make and can be used for many purposes.

Beginner knitting doesn’t have to be limited to scarves and pot holders. Knitting leaves and other decorations is an excellent project for knitters who are just learning the craft. In only a few minutes, you can create a simple, versatile item that can be used for embellishing clothing, decorating your home, or even as a children’s toy. All you need is a knowledge of basic knitting stitches and techniques and the yarn and needles of your choice. The best part is, if you make a mistake, it’s quick and easy to just start over.

Choose a yarn in your desired weight, fiber and color, and select needles appropriate for the weight of yarn you chose (see the yarn label for a needle size recommendation).

Cast on 3 stitches.

Work the next 16 rows as follows: 1st Row: Knit to end. Even Rows 2 through 14: Purl to end. 3rd Row: Knit 1, yarn over, knit 1, yarn over, knit 1. 5th Row: Knit 2, yarn over, knit 2, yarn over, knit 2. 7th Row: Knit 3, yarn over, knit 3 yarn over, knit 3. 9th, 11th, and 13th Rows: Knit 1, slip 1, knit 1, pass slipped stitch over, knit 1, yarn over, knit 1, yarn over, knit 1, knit 2 together, knit 1. 15th Row: Knit 1, slip 1, knit 1, pass slipped stitch over, knit to last 3 stitches, knit 2 together, knit 1. 16th Row: Purl to end.

Repeat the 15th and 16th rows until there are 3 stitches left on your needle.

Knit 2 together, slip the stitch on your right needle back to your left, and knit 2 together again. This will leave one stitch on your right needle.

Alternate purl and knit stitches, treating your stitch as a row, 6 times, or until the leaf’s “stem” is your desired length.

Break your yarn, leaving a tail of about four inches, and thread the tail through the remaining stitch with a tapestry needle.

Weave in the ends.

Tip

Use darker green or brown yarn and a tapestry needle to embroider your finished leaf, adding veins or edging.

Gather leaves from outside to inspire your choice of colors.

Be creative with colors and textures of yarn. Try switching colors in the middle of your leaf to create variegated or turning fall leaves.

About the Author

Amy Wilde has worked as a grant developer, copy editor, writing tutor and writer. Based in Portland, Ore., she covers topics related to society, religion and culture. Wilde holds a Bachelor of Arts in English literature and classical civilization from the University of Toronto.