How to Knit a Circle Scarf for Beginners

By Rachel Kolar
A circle scarf is as simple as a traditional scarf, if you use circular needles.

A circle scarf is an elegant alternative to a traditional scarf. Rather than a long rectangle, a circle scarf is a large loop of knit fabric that the wearer hangs around her neck. Although knitting a seamless loop of fabric may seem daunting, it's simple if you have the correct tools. By using circular needles, you can knit an infinity scarf as easily as a traditional scarf. The simplest pattern for a circle scarf uses seed stitches, but once you get the hang of knitting on circular needles, you can adapt any pattern you like.

Cast on 320 stitches.

Lay your needles in a straight line. Check to make sure that all the cast-on stitches are on the same side of the needles. Turn any that are twisted the wrong way. If you have a twisted stitch on circular needles, it will not eventually correct itself as it does on straight needles, so you must fix it immediately.

Place a stitch marker or safety pin on your last stitch. This will help you see when you start a new row.

Knit one, purl one across the first row. When you reach the last stitch, knit it to the first stitch. Your stitches will be knit together into a large circle instead of a straight line.

Continue to knit one, purl one until your scarf is 10 inches wide, purling your final stitch in the same row as your stitch marker.

Bind off in pattern. Sew in any loose ends with the yarn needle.

Tip

When you use circular needles, you are always knitting on the right side of the pattern. If you want to convert a scarf pattern for straight needles into a circle scarf pattern, always use knit stitches in place of purl stitches and purl stitches in place of knit stitches when knitting even-numbered rows.

If you have trouble with circular needles, you can also knit a traditional scarf and sew the ends together. This allows you to use straight needles, but leaves a visible seam in the scarf.

About the Author

A resident of the Baltimore area, Rachel Kolar has been writing since 2001. Her educational research was featured at the Maryland State Department of Education Professional Schools Development Conference in 2008. Kolar holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from Kenyon College and a Master of Arts in teaching from the College of Notre Dame of Maryland.