How to Draw Converse Shoes

By Christine Kincaid

If you're stuck somewhere and bored with nothing to draw, why not try drawing your shoe? Shoes are great objects for practicing drawing because they have a familiar but tricky form and lots of details. Converse shoes are fun to draw because they're a recognizable icon and because they come in many different colors and patterns, so you can color them any way you want.

Set your shoe in front of you and study it. Shoes can seem tricky because they're full of bumps and ridges. Those bumps and ridges correspond to the shape of the foot inside it. Study how the back of the heel goes in and out around the heel of a foot. Think about how thick the sole is. Remember, there must be room for a sole and a foot in the shoe you are drawing.

Rough out the basic shape of the shoe. Be very loose and let your pencil follow all the curves that the foot would make inside the shoe. It's okay to cross your lines all over each other---you're just trying to get a basic shape at this point.

Converse Shoe Sketch

Add details, such as the tongue and eyelets and outline of the Converse logo. Each time you put a line of a detail on that shoe, it should follow the form of the shoe you're creating. The stitching lines need to follow the object of the shoe.

Once you're satisfied, carefully erase some of your preliminary lines to make your shoe easier to see. Draw the final details like the shoelace, being careful to visualize which side of the lace crosses over and which under.

Converse Shoe in Ink

Use a pen to trace over all the final lines. Once the ink is completely dry, erase your pencil lines.

Converse Shoe Drawing

Color in your shoe in any color or pattern you want. One coloring tip is to make the color of the tongue slightly darker than the body of the shoe. This will give it extra dimension. Color the inside of the shoe one shade darker than that.

About the Author

Christine Kincaid has been a professional writer since 2004. She has a Bachelor of Arts degree in English and has written many non-fiction and fiction pieces over the years. She's been a professional artist since 2002, working primarily as a muralist and scene painter.