How to Add a Wire Hanger to Frames

By Contributor ; Updated September 15, 2017

Things Needed

  • Wooden frame
  • Measuring tape
  • Wire cutters
  • Picture hanging kit, readily available at home improvement stores, including the wire and eye screws
  • Pliers
A solid wooden frame accepts wire hangers better than composite or plastic materials.

Many wooden frames come with a metal hanger on the top of the frame known as a sawtooth hanger. While convenient, these hangers aren't very reliable, especially if the picture, glass or painting contained in the wooden frame is heavy. Wire hangers, however, are much stronger and can support more weight, which is why professional picture framers and artists prefer them. Adding a sturdy wire hanger to a wooden frame isn't difficult and will provide extra security to your wall hanging.

Use the measuring tape to find where the wire will go on the frame. Measure the height of the frame and divide that measurement by three. The wire should be placed in the upper third of the frame.

Measure the wire about six inches longer than the width of the frame. Cut the excess wire off with the wire cutters.

Insert the eye screws into the back of the frame on each vertical side on the top third section. Use the measuring tape to make sure that the eye screws are placed the same distance down from the top on both sides. When twisting in the eye screws, watch carefully that they do not go all the way through to the front of the frame. Stop twisting if you see a slight bulge appearing on the front side of the frame where the eye screw is.

Thread the wire through one of the eye screws, leaving two inches of extra at the end. Use pliers to twist the extra wire several times tightly around the wire you strung through the eye screw.

Thread the free end of the wire through the other eye screw. Before you twist it secure, make sure that the wire has a little give, but not enough so that when it is hanging the wire goes above the frame's edge. Adjust the length of the wire as needed.

Twist the end of the wire tightly around the wire you threaded.