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Building a Spray Booth

By Jim Hagerty ; Updated January 09, 2018
Building a Spray Booth

Preparing the Work Area

The most practical way to build a spray paint booth is to dedicate an area of a well-ventilated garage or shed. The process begins with thoroughly sweeping and dusting the area, freeing it from obstructions. The area is then measured and marked to indicate where the booth's frame will sit. Indoor booths are commonly placed near windows or doors and electrical outlets.

Wall Construction

Walls are constructed by building a frame according to desired measurements. Most frames are built from PVC pipe or other material that can be dismantled later. Permanent frames are sometimes made with wood or steel. When the frame has been constructed, walls and ceiling are created using clear plastic paint sheeting (12-by-400 foot rolls are common). All four sides are covered, with openings fashioned for ventilation and entry.

Ventilation

A spray paint booth must be properly ventilated. After walls are constructed, fans are elevated at each end of the booth. Plastic around fan openings is taped off and sealed. When booth fans are in use, one blows air in from one end, while the other sucks fumes and stagnant air out through the other. Fans sizes are chosen based on size of the booth. Larger booths require larger fans (see Resources). Common house fans, positioned to create a vacuum effect, are sometimes used in small booths. Space heaters are also used to provide the proper painting temperature.

About the Author

Jim Hagerty is a writer and journalist who began writing professionally in 1996. He has had articles published in the "Rock River Times," "Builder's Journal" and various websites. He earned a Bachelor of Science in public relations and journalism from Northern Michigan University in Marquette.