Graduation Poster Board Ideas

By Fiona Miller
Graduation tassel

Whether you're creating a poster to honor a graduate or for advertising the school's exercises, it is important to keep the poster simple and legible so your honoree or fellow graduates can accurately retain the information they need. While you can truly let your creative spirit fly with this project, use these ideas to get you started.

Pictures

Make a small collage of pictures of your senior class throughout the years or the graduate you are honoring. Make sure it doesn't take up the entire poster to ensure it stays clean looking and streamlined. You can use one quarter of the page (horizontally or vertically) for a collage of pictures, and place the information or congratulatory message beside it or underneath it.

Get Crafty

Go to your local craft supply store and find the scrapbook section. There, you will find several 3-D stickers, including small caps and gowns, messages of congratulations and diplomas. Stick these on your congratulatory poster or on your information poster for a sleek and simple look.

Baby Photos

Following the same design structure as the collage, make a collage (or a single photo) of your classmates or honored graduate as a baby. Place it vertically or horizontally on your poster, or smack dab in the middle. Print the information or congratulatory message around the photos, next to them or underneath them. If you place the photo in the middle, you also can embellish the sides with rhinestones, glitter or other borders.

From the Kids

If your graduate has a child or very young siblings, draw a picture of a simple graduation hat, gown or diploma on the poster. Have the child or sibling color with markers and embellish with rhinestones and glitter.

For the Party

If you're thinking of making a poster to lay on a table at a party, purchase a three-fold poster board. Print (or find and make copies of) several pictures of your graduate throughout the years. Cut out pieces of construction paper a little bigger than the photos themselves, place them on the poster first and then the attach the pictures on top of them, providing a backdrop.

About the Author

Writing since 2008, Fiona Miller has taught English in Eastern Europe and also teaches kids in New York schools about the Holocaust. Her work can be found on Overstock.com, ConnectED and various other Web sites. Miller holds a B.A. in French from Chapman University and an M.A. in educational theater from New York University.