DIY: Hot Stamping

By Caroline Baldwin
Wooden spoons and scoops are nice items to hot stamp.

Transfer color and black and white images to wood with a hot stamp. The decorations and customizations are endless with the right tools. Wooden items can come to life with a hot stamp. The designs can be created on a computer and completely customized to your needs. Print the images and/or text and get ready to create.

Design your hot stamp image on a computer. It may be a shape, logo or text. Reverse the image to where it is mirrored on your screen. This is very important with text so it will transfer correctly.

Print your design on white copy paper with a laser printer. Ink jet printers will not work as the ink is not heat transferable. You can print your design in black and white or color.

Attach the hot stamp tip or transfer point to the iron. Turn the wood burning iron to "on" and let it heat up per the directions on the packaging.

Cut out your design with the scissors. Cut the design with enough paper around it so you have room to tape it down on the surface without the iron touching the tape. Do not trim all of the way up to the design.

Flip the paper over so the design is facing the wood surface. Position the design in the exact spot you would like to hot stamp.

Tape a side of the paper to the wood. Only one side should be taped so you can easily flip the paper to see if it is stamping.

Hold the open end of the paper firmly down on the wood surface. Place the tip of the iron on the design. Keep the tip in motion while applying pressure. It is best to move the tip in small circles to include all sections of the design.

Flip the paper up on the open end to check if the design is stamping. Remove the paper and the tape when the entire design has been transferred.

Tip

Print multiple designs in case you trim the paper too close. Test designs and colors by experimenting on a scrap of wood.

Warning

Use extreme caution when using the wood burning iron. It is very hot and can burn your fingers as you hold the paper. If you notice the paper turning brown, it is time to stop applying heat as the paper may catch fire.

About the Author

Caroline Baldwin, a corporate communications director located in South Carolina, began writing in 1998. Her work has been published in publications across the United States and Canada including Rolling Stone, Boating Life, Waterski and Wakeboarding magazines. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in communication studies from The College of Charleston.