Weller Soldering Gun Instructions

By Joshua Kinser
Weller solder irons are used to melt solder and make conductive connections on electronic components.

Soldering is the technique of melting metal to create conductive connections for electronic components and to connect metal with metal for other applications. Soldering irons are the devices used. There is a wide variety of irons and iron stations and soldering irons can be purchased at most online and local hardware stores. Weller is one of the leading manufacturers of soldering irons; using their soldering irons can be effectively done by following a few steps.

Secure the device to be soldered to a bench using a bench vice if necessary. You do not want the device being soldered to move as soldering often requires working on very small connections and takes great dexterity.

Plug in soldering iron and turn the soldering iron on. Place soldering iron in holding station and allow the iron to preheat. Set the temperature on the iron to the appropriate temperature for the project you are executing. Many Weller soldering irons have one single operating temperature of 400 degrees. Wait for the soldering iron to heat up. This will usually require around 2 minutes.

Test tip of the soldering iron to ensure it is properly heated. Take a piece of solder and touch it to the tip. It should melt immediately when touched to the solder iron tip.

Clean the tip of the soldering iron by wiping it quickly on a wet sponge.

Grab the handle of the solder iron and touch the tip of the solder iron to the area where the connection is going to be made.

Place the solder onto the tip of the soldering iron and let the solder melt onto the connection area. The idea here is to let the solder flow off of the iron, onto the wire or metal that is going to be connected, and then allowing it to gather onto the area where the connection is being made in the shape of a pyramid.

Remove the solder from the iron and then slowly remove the solder iron from the melted solder connection area.

Keep the device where the connection was made very still and return the soldering iron to the solder iron holder. Turn off the solder iron if there is no other connection to be soldered.

About the Author

Joshua Kinser began writing professionally in 1999. He has worked as a staff writer for the "Pensacola News Journal" and is the author of Moon Handbook's "Guide to the Florida Gulf Coast." Kinser earned an Associate of Arts in journalism with an emphasis in biology from Pensacola State College.