How to Wear a Gun Holster

By Eric Jonas
A gun holster, safe and easy, one-handed access, your weapon
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A gun holster is a device that secures a weapon to the body while providing easy access for the purpose of security and protection. Common holsters are those that can be attached to the waist, beneath the arm or at the ankle, and most are made from a stiff material to facilitate one-handed access to the weapon. The location for a holster is an individual decision, but each location comes with a few instructions to ensure proper positioning during wear.

Hip Holster

Step 1

Fasten a hip holster belt around your waist. The belt should sit around your navel. A hip location is the most easily accessible spot for a holster.

Step 2

Position the holster on the dominant side of your body. If you are right-handed, position the holster just slightly behind your right hip. If you are left-handed, the holster is positioned just slightly behind your left hip. The holster can be worn on the opposite side of your body (referred to as the support side), but this is an uncommon location because it does not allow the same ease of access.

Step 3

Use the holster clips or buckles to attach it to the belt.

Shoulder Holster

Step 1

Attach the holster to the harness with the holster’s clips or buckles. When attaching the holster to your support side, the holster is positioned so the gun handle faces forward. When the holster is attached to your strong side, it should allow for the gun handle to face the rear.

Step 2

Put on the harness and adjust it so the back straps are centered high on your back. These straps should sit just below a shirt`s collar.

Step 3

Adjust the shoulder pads to sit closer to your neck than your shoulder joint and high on the shoulder.

Ankle Holster

Step 1

Attach the ankle band around your ankle. Again, the band can be attached to your strong or support side.

Step 2

Secure the strap above your calf to prevent the holster from slipping.

Step 3

Position the holster on the inside of your ankle and secure with the snaps.

About the Author

Eric Jonas has been writing in small-business advertising and local community newsletters since 1998. Prior to his writing career, he became a licensed level II gas technician and continues to work in the field, also authoring educational newsletters for others in the business. Jonas is currently a graduate student with a Bachelor of Arts in English and rhetoric from McMaster University.