Things Hidden on the Dollar Bill

By Natalie Saar
One Dollar bills

The dollar bill is said to have secret symbols on it, some of which are thought to be linked to the Freemasons--a secret society. Many of the forefathers were also Freemasons which is why some say that there is so much freemasonry imagery in the dollar. Many elements of the dollar are not hidden, but rather overlooked, like the large letter on the face side that indicates where the bill was made.

Spider

Using Magnifying Glass on upper left side of Dollar bill

The spider is one of several hidden images on the dollar bill. On the upper left hand corner of the large “1” on the upper right hand side of the bill, you will see a small figure that looks like a spider. Some people say it also looks like an owl. No one knows for sure what it is, or if it is purposefully on the dollar. It is so small that is it almost indiscernible. One theory is that it is a flaw in the printing press and the machinery creates the appearance of a spider.

The Eye

Eye in pyramid of Dollar bill

The eye, while not hidden, has a lot of speculation about it. The eye sits atop an unfinished pyramid. This symbol is used by the Freemasons, but it dates back as far as the ancient Egyptians. No clear explanation exists as to why this prominent symbol was put on the dollar bill, which only fuels speculation that it is a message of the freemasons.

13

Eagle on Dollar bill

The number thirteen is prominent on the dollar bill, but pretty well hidden. It represents the original 13 colonies. The eagle is holding a plant with 13 leaves in one claw and 13 arrows in the other. His shield contains 13 stripes and 13 stars are over his head. “E Pluribus Unum” contains 13 letters. The pyramid has 13 steps on it. The Department of the Treasury seal contains 13 stars as well.

Feathers

Close Up of Eagle on Dollar bill

The Eagle's feathers on one wing total at 32, which is a very significant number among the Freemasons. There are 32 ordinary degrees of Freemasonry. The other wing has 33 feathers, representing the final, near unattainable Freemason degree.

About the Author

Natalie Saar began writing professionally at the age of 19. She majored in journalism and her writing has appeared in the magazine "Generation WHY" as well as "The Clause" newspaper. Saar graduated from the University of California, Riverside with a Bachelor of Arts in media and cultural studies.