Team-Building Scavenger Hunt Ideas

By Jennifer Eblin
One idea involves letting teams take pictures for the scavenger hunt.

Scavenger hunts are an easy way to incorporate team building into your corporate retreat or school assembly. The games force individuals to work together as a team to find everything on the list. Teams who can’t function together aren't able to complete the mission. The basic goal of the game is to find the items requested, but team-building scavenger hunt ideas include different ways of getting the teams to work together.

Common-Goal Hunt

In the common-goal hunt, individuals work together to reach a common goal that relates back to the items on their list. For example, ask the teams to help find items for a soup kitchen in the area. Get a list of items needed from the food kitchen and incorporate those items onto your list. Teams may need to find canned vegetables, soup and dried meats. If you’re nearing the holidays, ask the teams to find food that will go toward feeding hungry families in your area. Include perishable and nonperishable foods on the list and give each team a cooler and ice for storing their items. The point is to find everything and deliver it to the family, rather than finding everything before another team.

Hint Hunt

In a hint hunt, you give teams a hint that leads them to each item on the list, instead of telling them what to find. For example, instead of telling the teams to find a guitar pick, you might tell them to find an object you use to play a guitar. You can also create a larger type of hunt that involves hiding items in specific locations around your town or neighborhood. You place a box of the items in one location and include a hint that leads the team to their next location and next clue. The teams must decipher the clues to reach the next location and find all items at each location.

Photo Hunt

For a photo scavenger hunt, you need to give each team a digital camera and a list of things, places, people or actions. For the actions, request that the teams come back with a picture of each person on the team doing at least one of the required actions. For example, you might ask the teams to take pictures of washing someone’s windows, milking a cow or just petting a dog. The team members work together to find everything on the list and ensure that each member participates.

About the Author

Jennifer Eblin has been a full-time freelance writer since 2006. Her work has appeared on several websites, including Tool Box Tales and Zonder. Eblin received a master's degree in historic preservation from the Savannah College of Art and Design.