How to Tape Flat Feet

By Stephanie Abir
Learn how to tape flat feet.

The term flat feet refers to a condition that is caused by the inside arch of the feet being flat rather than curved. This causes the entire foot to touch the ground instead of slightly arching in the middle. It is a painless condition for the most part that can be genetic or caused by an injury. Taping flat feet will help prevent further injury to the feet, ankles and calf. It is important to do this before activities such as sports that require jumping or running. Learning to do this properly can save you serious complications.

Clean your foot and ankle so there is no dirt on them. If you have considerable hair around the ankles, it is best to shave it off with a razor.

Hold the tape vertically with the end pointing down. The tape should be positioned just behind the thumb joint on the inside of the foot.

Wrap the tape around your feet so it goes directly across and under until you have formed a complete circle of tape. Make sure the tape lies flat on your skin so the wrap stays put.

Rip the tape once you have formed a circle around your foot and move the tape into a horizontal position. The end of the tape should be pointing toward your toes.

Press the end of the tape perpendicularly to the band of tape around the foot and pass the tape back around your heel. The tape should be directly below the ankle joint.

Pass the tape down along the outside of the ankle and make it pass under your foot coming up along your arch. Rip the tape when you reach the horizontal band of tape on the inside of the foot

Apply a second layer of tape from the inside of the foot, around the heel and underneath along your arch. This layer of tape should be placed slightly higher than the first layer.

Tip

You can use duct tape if you have a skin allergy to the adhesive on athletic tape.

Warning

Do not leave your foot wrapped for more than 12 hours in row without removing the tape.

About the Author

Based in New Hope, Pa., Stephanie Abir has been writing business- and health-related articles since 1980. Her work has appeared in “Business Week” magazine and “American Health” magazine. Abir holds a doctorate in American literature from the University of South Carolina.