How to Store Rolling Tobacco

By Perry Piekarski
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Knowing how to properly store tobacco is essential for an avid smoker who likes to roll his own cigarettes or smoke from a pipe. If stored improperly, tobacco will go stale, affecting its flavor and freshness. Keeping tobacco hydrated can help prevent the flavor from fading or growing too harsh. Following a few simple steps to store your tobacco properly can help you preserve the flavor and maintain the freshness of your tobacco.

Step 1

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Choose resealable plastic containers that are large enough to store your tobacco comfortable with just a bit of extra space. Plan to use a different container for each brand and flavor of tobacco to avoid accidentally mixing the flavors.

Step 2

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Label the containers so you will know which kind of tobacco is inside.

Step 3

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Place the tobacco into the bottom of the containers.

Step 4

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Place a piece of aluminum foil on top of the tobacco in each container. Cut the foil so it is the right size to cover the tobacco completely without being folded.

Step 5

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Keep the tobacco hydrated by placing a damp paper towel folded into a square on top of the tin foil. Make sure the paper towel doesn't touch the tobacco. Then place the lids on the containers. Be careful to keep the containers level so the paper towel doesn't move and touch the tobacco.

You can also keep your tobacco hydrated by placing a cigar humidifier in the container.

Step 6

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Check the paper towels regularly to maintain humidity levels and to make sure there isn't mold growing in your tobacco.

About the Author

Supported by his wit, charm and love for language, Perry Piekarski is a professional writer holding a Bachelor of Arts in professional writing from Kutztown University of Pennsylvania. Piekarski is the former Executive Editor of Binge Gamer, a full-time sales associate at Best Buy and, whenever he has an extra moment, a freelance writer.