How to Sharpen a Swedish Spoon Ice Auger

By Brenda Priddy
A Swedish spoon ice auger cuts through the ice for winter fishing.

A Swedish spoon ice auger has blades shaped similarly to a spoon. The blades are rounded at the tip for digging deeply into the ice. An ice auger is typically used to create a hole in the ice in which to place an ice-fishing line. It is important that the auger be sharp to make a clean cut through the ice. If the blades are dull, the auger could cause the surrounding ice to crack, which is a potential safety hazard. Sharpening the auger blades is a simple process that should become a regular part of your ice-fishing routine.

Fill a large metal or plastic bowl with water. Freeze the water inside the freezer overnight. This block of ice will help you test the sharpness of the auger once you sharpen it.

Attach the flannel wheel to the polisher. Place a small amount of rogue onto the flannel polishing wheel.

Turn the polisher on and run it on the leading edge of the Swedish auger. Run the polishing wheel up and down the cutting edge, taking care to not hold the wheel in one place for more than a few seconds. This will sharpen the blade evenly.

Add more rogue and polish the other side of the blade. Polish each side of the blade for about five minutes.

Test the sharpness of the blade after polishing. Drill the auger through the piece of ice that you froze the night before. If you are unhappy with the sharpness of the auger, then polish each side of the blade a second or third time. Continue polishing until the blade is as sharp as you desire.

Tip

You can also sharpen the auger with an auger sharpener. Drag the sharpener across the cutting blade in one smooth motion. After you have dragged the sharpener across the entire blade, reverse the sharpener and drag it across the blade in the other direction.

Warning

Take care when sharpening the blade. If the polishing wheel slips, you may cut your hands or some other part of your body with the auger blade. Always take appropriate safety precautions when sharpening an auger.

About the Author

Brenda Priddy has more than 10 years of crafting and design experience, as well as more than six years of professional writing experience. Her work appears in online publications such as Donna Rae at Home, Five Minutes for Going Green and Daily Mayo. Priddy also writes for Archstone Business Solutions and holds an Associate of Arts in English from McLennan Community College.