How to Sell Antique Cups and Saucers

By Samantha Hanly

If you love antiques, you can learn to sell antique cups and saucers as a part time money-making venture or even as a full time business.

If you have many antique cups and saucers that you would like to liquidate, contact an auction house such as Sotheby's or Christie's, both located in New York. Auction houses help people sell their most valuable goods for a high price. You may contact them online.

Ask a local antique dealer if you may consign your cups and saucers in his store. Consignment means he sells your wares for you, and pays you a percentage of the purchase price. You should require at least 50 percent of the purchase price.

Frequent yard sales and especially estate sales. You are likely to find antique cups and saucers that are no longer wanted by the family, but could be highly coveted by your customers.

Learn the value of what you have. Visit antiques dealerships, and ask them their opinions about what your antique cups and saucers are worth. Always ask them to explain their reasoning in detail, and take notes to help you remember important details. Check out your local community colleges for any classes they may offer about appraising antique cups and saucers. You may or may not find any, but is worth finding out. Ask in the Art History Department if they have any classes that might cover relevant information. Even if the college itself does not offer the type of class you are looking for, chances are somebody there will know where you can learn more about antique cups and saucers and figuring out their value so you know how much to charge for them.

Purchase a good quality, digital camera. If you are not confident in your ability to take pictures, ask a friend who is. You must have excellent photographs of your antique cups and saucers. Post these photographs on eBay to sell your antique dishes online.

About the Author

Samantha Hanly is an organic vegetable gardener, greenhouse gardener and home canner. She grows a substantial portion of her family's food every year. After receiving her bachelor's degree, Hanly embarked on a career teaching dramatic arts, arts and crafts, and languages. She became a professional writer in 2000, writing curricula for use in classrooms and libraries.