How to Score in Farkle

By Annabelle Lee
Farkle can be played by two or more players.

Farkle is a fun and addicting game of chance that uses six dice. The game ends when one player has accumulated 10,000 points. Over the years, the official scoring method has remained the same. However, Farkle scoring has developed some variations depending on the region in which you are playing. It is wise to agree on a scoring method before beginning the game. Farkle is also called by different names in different parts of the country, including Cosmic Wimpout, Hot Dive, Greed, Zonk and Zilch.

Count at least 550 points on your first roll to enter the game. If you do not have at least 550 points, you must pass and wait for your turn to come around again.

Score 100 points for each single 1 rolled. Score 50 points for each single 5 that is rolled.

Throw three dice of the same value and the roll is worth 100 times the face value. Examples: Roll three 6s for a score of 600; roll three 5s for a score of 500. The only exception to this is rolling three 1s; that roll scores 1,000 as opposed to 100 points.

Roll four-of-a-kind and score three times the value of three-of-a-kind; five-of-a-kind scores four times the value of three of a kind; and six-of-a-kind scores eight times the value of three-of-a-kind. Example: four 3s scores 900; five 3s score 1,200 and six 3s scores 2,400 points.

Throw three pair and score 500 points. Example: Two 1s, two 3s and two 5s.

Roll three triplets and score 2,500 points. Example: three 6s and three 2s.

Score 1,500 for rolling a straight. Example: 1-2-3-4-5.

Farkle three times in a row and you must subtract 1,000 points from your score. Farkling is throwing your dice and rolling zero points.

Continue around the table until everyone has had an equal number of turns. See who has the highest score and determine the winner.

Tip

You will notice variations in the rules and scoring depending on what region of the country you are playing in. The scoring method explained here is the most common and considered the official scoring of Farkle.

About the Author

Annabelle Lee has been working in the journalism field since 1990. She was a teacher and yearbook adviser for four years and holds two associate degrees from her local community college where she currently teaches computer classes. Lee also writes for a local newspaper and was a proofreader for McGraw-Hill.