How to Run a Prize Wheel

By Meg Butler
Use dollar bills to decorate prize wheel games.

A prize wheel is a game of chance with many winners. When participants spin the wheel, the section they land on dictates their winnings. Everyone loves a prize, and a prize wheel is a great way to elicit participation and excitement from your party guests, potential clients or customers. And the game is as easy to run as it is to play. Simply keep the rules clear and the prizes coming, and it's sure to be a hit at your next event.

Determine the price that you will charge participants to spin the prize wheel. This cost can be determined by the profits you are looking for, the cost of prizes, the cost of the wheel (or rental) and projected participation. Or, for promotional events, you might only charge a nominal fee or allow participants to play for free or in exchange for contact or other information.

Advertise the prize wheel at least one month before you run the game. Let potential participants know how much it will cost to spin the wheel (if anything) and the types of prizes available.

Limit the number of tickets that you give away/sell to the number of prizes that you have available. If participants can play for free, announce any limits on the amount of times a single participant can play.

Describe the available prizes to the participants and audience members.

Allow each participant to spin the wheel. Consider asking them their name, where they are from or what brought them to the event (or any other banter) to make the contest more entertaining.

Announce the participant's prize to the participant and the spectators.

Distribute the prize.

If, for any reason, you run out of a certain prize, remove it from the prize wheel. If participants land on this empty space, allow them to spin again.

About the Author

Based in Houston, Texas, Meg Butler is a professional farmer, house flipper and landscaper. When not busy learning about homes and appliances she's sharing that knowledge. Butler began blogging, editing and writing in 2000. Her work has appered in the "Houston Press" and several other publications. She has an A.A. in journalism and a B.A. in history from New York University.