Rules for Knock Hockey

By Gregg Lerner
The traditional knock hockey game

This classic board game has withstood the test of time. Among its many attractions are the simplicity of both its rules and the ease of actual game play. While play is primarily based on the aspects of hockey, the layout of the board demands skilled bank shots that are more synonymous with pool...think Wayne Gretzky meets Minnesota Fats. The game appeals to a wide range of players of all ages.

Object of the Game

To shoot the puck across the opponent's goal line for a goal.

Starting a Game

Play begins when one player places the puck in the center circle and snaps a shot on the opponent's goal. Then, the players alternate shots until a goal is scored.

How to Shoot

Players use a one-foot long, simulated hockey stick to shoot a puck approximately two inches in diameter. A player can score a goal by directly shooting the puck into the goal or by hitting angled shots off the side boards toward the opposing net. A diamond-shaped block sits three inches in front of each goal line, yielding few straight-on shots and demanding a player convert most of his goals from banked shots off the side boards.

How to Score

Any shot that sends any portion of the puck over the opponent's goal line is considered a goal.

Shots out of Play

Any shot sent off the board is considered a penalty and allows the opponent to return the puck to the playing surface and place it into either one of the red circles in the defensive area of the player who knocked the shot off the playing surface before resuming action with a shot.

Position of Players

Players are only allowed to play from the area directly behind their respective goals. No shooting is allowed from the along the sides of the playing surface.

Scoring

One point is award for each goal scored.

About the Author

A lifelong resident of New Jersey, Gregg has been writing professionally since 1989. He has covered professional, college and high-school sports as a sportswriter for The Star-Ledger. He has a Bachelor of Arts in communications from William Paterson University and was honored with the Robert Kanaby Service Award from the New Jersey Interscholstic Athletic Association in 2002.