How to Replace the Barrel on a Ruger Super Blackhawk

By Tracy Underwood
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There are a number of reasons why, as a hobbyist gunsmith, you might want to replace the barrel of a Ruger Super Blackhawk. For example, the original barrel could be damaged or worn out. You may wish to substitute a longer or shorter barrel than that supplied by the factory. Perhaps you want to install an aftermarket barrel that does not have the "warning" notice engraved on the side. Regardless of the motivation, this project can be done by the hobbyist who has the proper tools.

After checking that the gun is not loaded, unscrew and remove the base pin latch screw, nut and spring. Pull the base pin out. Open the loading gate and remove the cylinder. Set these parts aside.

Remove the screw at the front of the ejector housing. Pull the housing forward and remove the ejector, spring and housing as a unit. Set these parts aside.

Place the action wrench on the front of the revolver frame. Refer to the wrench instructions as necessary. Tighten the bolts on the wrench.

Select the correct size bushings to fit the barrel. Sprinkle powdered rosin in the bushings and place the bushings on the barrel as close to the frame as possible.

Hold the bushings on the barrel and insert the barrel into the barrel vise. Tighten the bolts on the barrel vise. Be sure to get them very tight so that the barrel will not slip.

Grasp the handle on the action wrench and turn counterclockwise to remove the barrel.

Screw the new barrel into the frame until it is as tight as you can get it by hand. Remove the old barrel from the barrel vise and replace it with the new barrel, with the frame attached. Tighten the barrel vise bolts.

Grasp the handle of the action wrench and turn it clockwise to tighten the barrel. Stop when the barrel is fully tight and the front sight points straight up in relation to the revolver's frame.

Remove the action wrench from the revolver. Remove the revolver from the barrel vise. Reinstall the ejector assembly, cylinder, base pin, and latch.

About the Author

Since 2008 Tracy Underwood has been fulfilling a lifelong dream of writing professionally. He has written articles for Possumliving.com and Woodsloafing.com online, and in print for "Backwoodsman Magazine." Underwood holds an Amateur Extra license from the FCC. He received an Electronic Technician certificate from the U.S. Navy BE/E school, NTC Great Lakes.