Rage Card Game Rules

By Alan Kirk
Rage, a card game, a special deck, playing cards
deck of cards image by timur1970 from Fotolia.com

The Rage card game is manufactured by the same company that makes the card game Uno. In Rage, players compete to accumulate as many points as possible through 10 rounds of play. Players win points by guessing how many tricks they will win in a round along with bonuses or penalties through the play of the hands.

Number of Players and Deal of The Hand

Rage is played with between two and 11 players. There are 10 rounds in the game. The first round starts with each player receiving 10 cards. Each subsequent round begins with one fewer card dealt to each player, with each player receiving only one card in the final round.

Determining The Trump Suit

Rage uses a trump suit at the beginning of each round. This suit can be changed later in the round through the use of special cards. To determine the initial trump suit, flip the top card of the deck face up after each player receives the correct number of cards to start the round. If a card other than a number is flipped up, place it on the bottom of the deck and continue flipping until a number card is flipped. The color of that card is the trump suit.

Bidding

Each player, starting with the player to the left of the dealer announces how many tricks she thinks she can win during the play of that round. This number is written down to each player's name on the score sheet to keep track of the bids.

Playing The Hand

The player to the left of the dealer leads the first card for the first trick. The cards are in six different colors and ranked numerically with zero being the lowest and 15 being the highest. Every player must play a card from the suit led, unless he does not have a card in that suit. In that case she may play any card from his hand she wishes. The trick is won by the player playing the highest card in the suit that was led, or the highest ranking trump card on that trick. Remember, trump cards may only be played if you do not have a card from the suit led.

Special Wild and Trump Cards

There are two wild Rage cards in the deck. When a player plays these, she can announce the card as any suit or number up to 16 that he wishes. By going up to 16, even though the deck is only to 15, this makes that card the strongest card in its suit if the player wishes. The second Wild Rage card cannot be played on that same trick. Changing the trump card is possible by playing one of the three Change Rage cards. When one of these are played, the trump card is placed on the bottom of the draw deck and the next card that is flipped over from the draw deck that is a suit is the new trump suit. There are also three Out Rage cards. If this card is played, the trump suit is canceled for the rest of the hand.

Mad Rage and Bonus Rage Cards

There are two each of the Mad Rage and Bonus Rage cards. These cards cannot win a trick. Instead, the Mad Rage card subtracts five points from the score of the player who wins the trick. The Bonus Rage card adds five points to the score of the player who wins the trick.

Scoring

Players win points based on the number of tricks won during the hand and the bid before the hand started. If the player wins the same number of tricks he bids, he gets one point per trick plus a bonus of 10 points. If his bid is incorrect, he still wins one point per trick won but has five points deducted from his score as a penalty.

Reneging

Reneging is an offense of playing a card from another suit or trump card when the player has a card from the suit that was led. Another player can challenge the play of a card other than the suit led. If the player that played the card has a card in his hand from the suit that was led, the offending player loses 10 points immediately. If he did not have any cards in the suit that was led in his hand and was challenged, the player that made the challenge loses 10 points immediately.

About the Author

Alan Kirk has been writing for online publications since 2006. He has more than 15 years' experience in catering, management and government relations. Kirk has a bachelor's degree in business management from the University of Maryland.