How to Get the Best Price for Old 33 1/3 Records

By Gracie Sprouse

Vinyl records are making a comeback even though most homes no longer have a record player. They are being copied for CDs and other music media. The fact that they have become obsolete has not deterred the vinyl record collector. Many albums and singles have greatly increased in price. Popular celebrities from the 1940s through the 1970s seem to be ranking the highest on want lists. As with any other product, a well known artist or group will be more highly desired. Some collectors specialize in collecting labels -- to them it won't matter who the artist is.

Search for other listings of the same record and compare the prices. Albums that are being auctioned may realize a lower price than the record is really worth. Compare listings that were not auctioned. Check the final price of ones that were recently sold.

Advertise your 33 1/3 records in publications and in online classified ad sites. Provide a thorough description. The description should include the artist's name, the name of the album, the recording company and any identification numbers that are shown on the album cover. A record without an album cover may still have some value and can usually be identified by the numbers etched in the edges of the center hole of the record.

Create package deals. For example, include a popular artist's recording along with two or three that were not so popular. Consumers may purchase the deal in order to get the one they want.

Research the artist or group in antiques publications such as Kovel's. Most public libraries carry a supply of reference books on antiques and other items for research along with books that can be taken out by patrons.

About the Author

Gracie Sprouse has been writing professionally since 1976. Her areas of expertise are in antiques, crafts, real estate, income taxes and small businesses. Her education consists of an Associate of Applied Science with a business and accounting major from Piedmont Virginia Community College.