How to Play 7-Up Cards

By Zachary Nguyen
7-Up is an easy, but entertaining game to play with friends.

Card games can be a fun way to connect with friends or to pass some time. From traditional games such as Go Fish or War to others such as Onze and 7-Up, card games have long been popular methods to pass the time or even the central focus of a party. The rules and objective of the card game 7-Up are easy to understand: set up seven cards, Ace to 7, in order, from a standard deck.

Designate a player to be the dealer for the round. The dealer hands out seven face-down cards to each player and places the remaining cards in the middle to be used as the draw pile. Make sure the seven cards are set up so that one face-down card is side by side with another face-down card. You should be able to designate a position, one to seven, for each face-down card.

Determine which player will start the round. It is customary that the player immediately to the right of the dealer will start. That player turns over the first card from the draw pile to begin the game.

Replace the drawn card with one of the seven face down cards when a player draws an appropriate card. For example, if a seven is drawn then the player can replace the seventh card. At the same time, the player flips over the face-down card in the seventh position and see whether that card can be played or not. If it is an ace to six, then it is playable. If not, it must be sent to the discard pile in the middle of the table. The player to the right then continues the turn.

Discard all unplayable cards immediately when drawn from the draw pile. These cards are 8s, 9s, 10s, Jacks, Queens and Kings. The remaining cards are all playable cards and you want to draw them as often as possible. The player that sets up a series of face up cards in the following order wins: Ace, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7.

About the Author

Zachary Nguyen is an avid guest writer and editor for a year and a half since 2009. His work appears in three publications at his university, including the weekly newspaper "Argus." He is currently in his third year of pursuing a Bachelor of Arts in mathematics and economics. Nguyen attends Wesleyan University.