How to Paint Cornhole Boards

By Kevin Krause
The colors, style, your cornhole board design, you
Paint brush and aqua paints image by PaulPaladin from Fotolia.com

Cornhole is a game that has grown in popularity as a fun outdoor activity at barbecues, tailgates and parties. The game is easy to pick up and play but can take practice to master. While some pre-made cornhole sets are available, most players construct their own. After you have cut and assembled all of the pieces, the final step in creating your own game set is painting a personalized finish.

Fill all nail and screw holes on the board with a good wood putty. Spread the putty with a putty knife. It is also a good idea to fill in any larger gashes or dings in the wood surface.

Sand down the entire surface of the board to a smooth finish. Be sure to pay extra attention to the areas filled with putty, sanding them even with the rest of the board.

Lay down a coat of primer on the entire surface of the board. Allow the first coat to dry and apply a second. Once the second coat has dried, do a quick once-over with sandpaper to remove any runs or inconsistencies in the cornhole board's surface.

Plan out your design while the primer dries. It is a good idea to sketch the designs for your cornhole board onto a piece of paper so you have a rough working guide as you paint, though you may choose to simply work freehand off the top of your head.

Apply a base coat of the dominant or background color for your board design. Use a wide-bristled brush and work in even, consistent strokes.

Use smaller brushes to add designs and embellishments on top of your base coat. This step is the most rewarding part of painting your cornhole board--the only limit is your own creativity. Try painting logos, objects, text and other images to bring a unique look to your board.

About the Author

Hailed as one of his native Baltimore's emerging writers in Urbanite Magazine, for the past five years Kevin Krause has been writing everything from advertising copy to prose and poetry. A recent grad holding a degree in English and creative writing from University of Maryland, Baltimore County, his most recent work can be found in The Urbanite.