How to Make a Wheel of Fortune Game Board

By Liza Hollis

Word-lovers everywhere simply cannot get enough of “Wheel of Fortune.” If you are one of these lexiphiles, you will be glad to know that with a few simple materials you can play the game at home on your own game board. Like the popular game show, the game is based on the classic word game “hangman.” You might want to keep a bank of words and phrases listed on slips of paper (organized by category) for easy game play that is not interrupted by brainstorming.

Draw a 12-inch round circle on a piece of cardboard. To draw the circle, you can either use a compass or trace a circle shape.

Cut out the circle with an Exact-o knife or a pair of scissors.

Draw a vertical line down the center of your circle.

Draw a horizontal line across the center of your circle.

lines, the sections, your board, a reference

Continue to draw lines to delineate the sections on your board. As a reference, think about cutting a pizza pie into slices, but make the slices considerably thinner so you have a lot of options when spinning the wheel.

Paint the sections in the individual colors of your choice. Then, outline each section with black paint so the separation between the sections is easy to see.

Label each section with point amounts. Be sure to vary your point options from space to space, don’t group similar prices closely together. Also include a few “Bankrupt” sections to be true to the game.

Draw an arrow on your piece of cardstock.

Cut out the arrow and paint as desired.

Place the arrow pointing out from the center of your game board and attach into place by piercing a metal brad through the arrow and the game board. To spin the wheel, players will flick the arrow to see where it lands.

To play the game, write the number of spaces in a word or phrase on a dry erase board. The players will take turns flicking the arrow to “spin the wheel.” As a player correctly guess the letter or solves the puzzle, give the respective amounts of points. Keep note of these points on the dry erase board or on individual sheets of paper.

About the Author

{{}}