How to Make a Scavenger Hunt for Adults

By Ginger Voight
Release the adventurer in all your friends with a photo scanveger hunt.

One way to spice up a normal party is organize your own scavenger hunt. These types of party games aren't just for little kids. In fact, the older your participants, the more complicated and creative it can get. Given that you can devise a scavenger hunt around just about any occasion or location, the possibilities are only as limited as your imagination.

Celebrate the Occasion

Creating a hunt around a theme makes the event more cohesive. It also sets it apart from any generic hunt. Make the occasion your theme. This can be anything from a specific holiday to a birthday or anniversary celebration. For Halloween, for instance, have your guests take photos of any allegedly haunted locations in your area. For an anniversary, have your guests recreate photos from the happy couple's history. Teams can take new photos posed in significant locations like the restaurant where they had their first date, or where he proposed.

Location, Location, Location

No matter where you live, your town offers an eclectic history all its own. Incorporate this into your scavenger hunt. Instruct your guests to take photos of the different landmarks around the city. If it's a neighborhood block party, set up clues all around your neighborhood so that your guests can get to know each other a little better through the game. For a school reunion, wake up the nostalgia by using the school itself, where you can plant items from the era.

Use Technology at Hand

With the prevalence of cell phones, especially those with cameras, it is easy to create a photo-based scavenger hunt no matter what your theme. Instead of a printed list, you can send texts with clues to your guests as they scatter throughout the city, which helps you keep groups separated throughout the process. In return, they send you their own photos of themselves, in the areas where your clues send them. Not only can you compile these efforts on your computer to share at the end of the evening, you can provide the video as a keepsake for your guests.

Clues for Adults

Devise puzzle clues that will provide an additional challenge for your guests or give them silly or embarrassing directives, like speaking in gibberish to a stranger, which they must video and share at the end of the hunt. Assign a point value to each clue, rewarding the boldest among your friends with higher points for the more complicated or embarrassing clues. Don't forget the prizes, which can range from cash to a bottle of champagne.

About the Author

Ginger Voight is a published author who has been honing her craft since 1981. She has published genre fiction such as the rubenesque romances "Love Plus One" and "Groupie." In 2008 Voight's six-word memoir was included in the "New York Times" bestselling book "Not Quite What I Was Planning." She studied business at the University of Phoenix.