How to Make Your Own Risk Game

By Chris Moore

Risk is one of the oldest and most well-known board games in the world with its world conquest, military strategy gameplay. Like many other classic games, it has inspired copycats and spinoff games using the same style with different themes. With some imagination, you can create your own Risk game with its own theme, one that centers around a specific point of world history, or perhaps a game where you conquer a world that exists in your own head.

Conquering the World

Choose a world or geographic location that the game will be played in. The game can naturally take place on this world or just on one continent or country in the world. You can also completely design your own game world.

Select a theme for the Risk game if you want one. For example, you can base the game around a specific war or era in history, especially if it fits in with the geographic location you selected.

Create the game board. If you have a map of the area you want the game to be in, you can photocopy it and then draw out the individual territories in each country that the game will use; otherwise, draw your whole world on paper. Glue the game map onto cardboard to make it sturdy.

Add the game pieces for the armies. You can always use miniature soldiers, but you can use any type of pieces. Just make sure you get several pieces in one color and two different shapes (one for one army and one for 10). Repeat this in six different colors for each possible player.

Include five to six six-sided dice to use for attacking and defense. It helps to get three dice in one color and three in another color. You can use dice from other board games or get dice from a gaming shop.

Add a deck of cards if you want the game to be complete. This could be the most difficult task, as you'll likely need to cut out and design the cards from paper or light cardboard. Each card will depict a territory on your game board along with one of three military figures of your choice.

About the Author

Chris Moore has been contributing to eHow since 2007 and is a member of the DFW Writers' Workshop. He received a Bachelor of Arts in journalism from the University of Texas-Arlington.