How to Make Your Own Personality Test

By James Garret
test image by multimartinator from Fotolia.com

Many people want to know how their personality compares to others. Some would also like to know how other people perceive them. You can fulfill these desires by creating your own personality test. Using an online personality test generator, you can customize the test to your liking. If you are curious about how people may respond to a particular question, conduct your own research using a personality test. Designing a personality test costs nothing, if you use a free generator.

Visit a free personality test generator (see Resources). These websites offer a free template to use for your personality test.

Write the introduction to your test in the appropriately labeled field. The introduction should inform the test-taker what they are being tested for. Give background information on the subject and criteria used.

Write the questions to your test in the appropriately labeled fields. Each question should be related to the general theme of your test. For example, if your personality test is testing for obsessive-compulsive tendencies, you might ask a question such as "How often do you wash your hands?"

Write the answers to each question in the appropriately labeled fields. The answers should give an indication on how the test-taker's personality relates to the theme of the test. Using the same example as above ("How often do you wash your hands?"), the answers might be "1-5 times a day," "5-10 times a day" and "10 times+ a day." These answers give insight on the test-taker's personality.

Assign a weighted value to each answer. Next to your answers is an empty field allowing a value to be added. This is used to issue the score-based results based on the answers. If you a measuring a personality trait, assign the highest value to the answer that highlights the most extreme representation of this trait.

In our example, we would assign "1-5 times a day" a value of 1, "5-10 times day" a value of 2 and "20+ times a day" a value of 3.

Type the possible results of your test in the appropriately labeled fields at the end of the test form. Each result is based on a score achieved by calculating the weighted value of each answer given. You can set which result coincides with which score range. When a user takes the test, the web software issuing the test will add up these values and present the test-taker with the appropriate result.

In our example, the results might be the following: "Not compulsive," "Mildly Compulsive" and "Very Compulsive."

Save your test. Share the link with family and friends.

About the Author

James Garret has been a professional freelance writer since 2005, working for mostly private clients. He also has experience working in the information technology field as a troubleshooter. He is pursuing a Bachelor of Science in computer science at the University of Kentucky.