How to Make Medieval Princess Hats

By Patti Perry
Trim a princess hat with a diaphanous veil

Women's head coverings of medieval times incorporated diaphanous fabric veils, often in layers falling to the shoulders and below. Gold gauze and sparkling jeweled trims appeared in authentic royal head coverings of the period and will delight any little princess wearing one today.

Draw a half circle on a large sheet of heavy paper. Decide how high you want the hat to be and make that measurement the height of the radius of the half circle.

Cut out the half circle shape and roll it to form a cone. Temporarily, tape the overlapping edges to secure them.

Place it on the child's head and adjust the size.

Adjust the tape so the hat fits comfortably. Cut away the excess paper so that the bottom edge of the hat is even.

Cut out felt or paper decorations of your choosing; glue them to the hat's exterior surface. Add faux jewels if desired. A border design around the bottom of the cone may represent a jeweled crown.

Make a small slice in the top of the cone and slide the corner ends of two, three-foot pieces of sheer fabric through the hole, so that they hang from the top, at the back of the head.

Drape one 3-foot piece of fabric over the cone and allow the other to hang lengthwise down the back. Secure the draped material to the cone with glue under the edge of the cone.

Measure under the child's chin, ear to ear, for the chin strap. Cut a length of 1/2-inch elastic to match the measurement.

Staple the elastic to each side of the princess hat. Make sure that the folded ends of the staples are on the outside of the hat.

Tip

The same technique can be used to make a hat of felt and fusing, sewn with machine or hand stitching. Decorate the fabric, if desired. Veil materials can be decorated with glitter to mimic gold and silver.

About the Author

Patti Perry is currently attending West Virginia University and expanding her knowledge base. She has worked as a freelance visual artist for 30 years, with specialties in watercolor and scherenschnitte. Originality of creation is her motivation and she continues to pursue this avenue in her writing. Perry is currently contributing articles to eHow.