How to Make a Chart for a Euchre Tournament

By Serm Murmson

The outcome of an individual euchre game is dependent not only on your skill, but on how well you interact with your partner. Therefore, the outcome of any one game is not the most accurate measure of individual skill. The "progressive" euchre tournament is the most popular form. It is structured so that partnerships rotate, thereby comparing and ranking individual players. Tournament rotation and scoring can be confusing, so a score chart should clearly indicate both a player's score and the sequence of rotation.

Progressive Tournament Chart

Count the number of players in the tournament. The number must be divisible by four in order for the tournament and chart to be straightforward. If the number of players is one more than a multiple of four, each player can have a "bye" round, during which they do not play.

Write down a number of lines equal to one less than the total number of players. For example, if there are 20 players, you will need 19 lines. Each player will be paired with every other player once.

Divide the total number of players by four. The result will be the number of separate tables at which a game is played during a round. Make a column in the chart for each individual table that will exist. Label the columns "Table 1," "Table 2," etc.

Mark each cell of the chart with the players who will be playing with and against each other during that particular round of play. For example, for the square corresponding to Round 1, Table 1, write "1&2 vs. 3&4." When filling in the chart, make sure that no two players are partnered together more than once.

Create a "Score" column on the far right.

Make enough copies of the chart so that each player in the tournament has their own score sheet. After each round of play, each player will write down the number of points he or she scored.

Tip

If there will be a tournament director or other overseeing body, a master score sheet may be useful. This score sheet should be able to account for the round-by-round score of one player per line.

About the Author

Serm Murmson is a writer, thinker, musician and many other things. He has a bachelor's degree in anthropology from the University of Chicago. His concerns include such things as categories, language, descriptions, representation, criticism and labor. He has been writing professionally since 2008.