How to Maintain a Shuffleboard Table

By Dylan Kennedy
Indoor shuffleboard, a waxed table, slide, one end
Thomas Northcut/Lifesize/Getty Images

Shuffleboard is a popular bar and party game that involves sliding pucks down a flat surface toward a scoring area. It's similar to the outdoor shuffleboard seen on cruise ships, but table shuffleboard is smaller in scope and played by hand. The table itself is the most important element of the game, so it requires the most attention and maintenance. Check and service your table regularly to ensure proper play.

Set up the table away from windows and sunlight. Keep the table in a room that has climate control so the temperature won't fluctuate much from season to season or from day to night.

Measure the bend of the table using a level. "Usually shuffleboards are set up with a slight concave in them but some people prefer a perfectly flat board," according to McClure Tables' Shuffleboard Maintenance Guide website. Set a level across either end of the table and try to slide a piece of paper under the level. On a slightly concave table, the paper will slide under the center of the level but get stuck at either end.

Use the table's climate adjusters to adjust the shape of the table, if necessary. Climate adjusters are vice-like devices located under the table. Tighten the bottom nut on the climate adjuster to create a more concave bend, or tighten the top nut for more of a convex bend.

Clean the board initially and at regular intervals -- based on how often you use it -- with a wood polish or cleaner. You can create your own solution with water, 1/4 cup of vinegar and 1 tsp. of linseed oil. Rub the board down with a rag, buffing it in a circular motion throughout.

Spray the table with a silicone spray. Cover the entire board with a thin layer of the material and let it sit for five to 10 minutes. The silicone will increase the speed of your table; it can be skipped based on your personal preference.

Sprinkle wax (also known as shuffleboard powder or dust) on the table. Apply a thin layer of wax evenly over the entire table, but not so much that you can't still see the surface of the table.

About the Author

Dylan Kennedy began writing professionally in 2003. His work has been published in the "Park Scribe," "Red Rocket Magazine" and online at PopFreeRadio.com. Kennedy has a Bachelor of Arts in English from Park University and a Master of Arts in creative writing from the University of Missouri.