Instructions for Sudoku Board Game

By Keith Allen
Sudoku puzzles are often played as a solitary game but also can be played as a board game.

The Sudoku Board Game utilizes the same challenging mathematical problems as the puzzles but in a format that can be enjoyed by up to four players. There are a number of commercially available Sudoku Board Games. Each differs somewhat in the details while all follow the same basic rules and procedures.

Board

The physical board of the Sudoku game varies a bit. Some manufacturers furnish a board and wooden tiles inscribed with the numbers. Other games use an erasable board and a marker where the players can write the numbers during their turn.

The erasable board games are more portable and can are often considered a travel game to keep travelers occupied during car trips.

Game Play

No matter what form the board takes, the game is played by the same rules. The players take turns trying to solve one cell of the puzzle. In one game each player has 30 seconds, a timer is included, to make their choice and place a tile on the board or write the number on the erasable board.

The objective of Sudoku is to fill each vertical and horizontal row of nine blanks with the numbers 1 through 9 in any order using each number once. Completing the puzzle, or board game, also requires filing each three space by three space portion of the larger grid with the numbers 1 through 9 using each digit once.

Points are given for different accomplishments and vary with game manufacturers. For example, points would be given for correct completion of a cell or for solving the most cells with extra points awarded for the player that completes a row, region or column. The player that accumulates the most points wins the game.

Starting Sudoku Board Game

Most board game manufacturers include a number of puzzles for starting games. Some games include puzzles of a variety of difficulties, so the contest can be played at a level appropriate for any age of players. In addition, players can use puzzles from books, the Internet or even newspapers to find puzzles. Depending on the game board style the players, write the numbers on the erasable board or place tiles in the proper locations on the board. Utilizing these sources the variety of puzzles available to the players of the Sudoku Board Game is almost endless.

About the Author

Keith Allen, a 1979 graduate of Valley City State College, has worked at a variety of jobs including computer operator, medical clinic manager, radio talk show host and potato sorter. For over five years he has worked as a newspaper reporter and historic researcher. His works have appeared in regional newspapers in North Dakota and in "North Dakota Horizons" and "Cowboys and Indians" magazines.