The History of Boopie by Anchor Hocking

By Sandra Petersen

Anchor Hocking began producing glassware in the early twentieth century, and was one of the glass-producing companies to survive the Great Depression. One of the most popular designs was Berwick, which came to be known as Boopie.

History

Berwick or Boopie glassware was produced by the Anchor Hocking Glass Corporation for almost three decades, from the 1950s to the 1970s. By that time, Anchor Hocking glassware was being produced by machines that could mold and press pieces at 90 or more items a minute.

Features

Boopie stemware has a row of marble-like beads encircling the outer edge of the foot or base. Pairs of raised lines extend from the top of the foot to the bottom and end in a rounded design above each bead. The bowl is a slightly rounded taper shape.

Colors

Boopie stemware was made in four colors: crystal (clear), amber, forest green and ruby red. The latter two were popular during the holiday season.

Function

According to listings on eBay and other online auction sites, Anchor Hocking items made in the Boopie design included candle holders, juice glasses, champagne glasses, water goblets, sherbet dishes and wine glasses.

Related Glassware

The Early American or Bubble and the Inspiration or Burple designs, also made by Anchor Hocking, are similar to the Berwick or Boopie design but with notable differences seen in the lines and beads in the stemware’s foot.

About the Author

For almost four years, Sandra Petersen has written fiction stories and non-fiction articles for sites like FaithWriters, Associated Content, Helium, Textbroker, and Triond as well as Demand Studios. Petersen attended the University of Wisconsin-Superior and earned her Bachelor's degree in elementary education with a minor in music education.