How to Hand Sew Webbing

By Charles Judd
Nylon webbing is found in many of the everyday items that you encounter.

Nylon webbing is a strong and versatile material. It is used in many different applications, such as backpack straps, purse straps, dog collars and leashes. Webbing is used extensively in many sporting goods products where durability is needed. If you find that you need to modify or repair webbing, you will see that it is a bit different from the normal sewing technique. Although most webbing is created with sewing machines, you can sew it by hand with a little patience and the right tools.

Cut a length of nylon thread sufficient to complete your project. Leave plenty of extra thread. The excess will be cut off later. Two feet of thread is a good starting point.

Thread a size 18 hand sewing needle with nylon thread. Pull half of the length of thread through the needle, so that the thread is now doubled up. Tie the loose ends together into a knot.

Place together the nylon webbing pieces that you wish to sew. Overlap the two pieces that you wish to join. If you are working with a single piece, fold the repair section double so that it has an overlap.

Place a thimble on your finger or thumb. Use this finger or thumb to press the needle through the stiff webbing.

Insert the needle through both pieces of webbing. Make the stitches near the outside edges of the webbing.

Use pliers to help pull the needle completely through the stiff webbing material.

Continue a normal stitching pattern until the first edge is completed. Tie an overhand knot in the thread and cut off the excess with scissors.

Repeat the stitching process for the other edge of the webbing. When finished, tie an overhand knot in the thread and cut off the excess.

Tip

Although a thimble and pliers are not critical to the operation, they will definitely help when trying to get your needle through the tough nylon webbing.

About the Author

Located in southeastern Kentucky, Charles Judd began writing semi-professionally in early 2005 for local publications. His work has been published in his hometown newspapers, the "Jackson Sun" and the "Jackson Times." He has many diverse interests and enjoys writing about various subjects. Charles holds a Bachelor of Science in industrial machine technology.