Easy Gym Games for Kids

By Jennifer Erchul
rubber, plastic balls, gym games
boy with ball image by Barmaley from Fotolia.com

Active kids are healthy kids, so encourage your children to play easy gym games. Physical activities help children stay fit, have fun and learn new skills. Gym games also help children increase their physical abilities, coordination and stamina. Games involving multiple players also help kids develop social skills they can take with them out of the gym.

Dodge Ball

Divide the kids into two teams. Each team gets one-half of the gym or playing field. The goal is to get the other team “out” using six medium-sized rubber-coated or heavier plastic balls. Place the six balls are in the center of the gym. On the agreed signal, each team rushes the balls and grabs what they can before retreating to their side. You throw the ball at the opposing team’s members. If someone catches it or gets hit below the shoulders, before the ball bounces, he is out and must leave the court. All active players must stay on their side and within bounds.

H.O.R.S.E.

This game can be played with two or more players, and all you need is a basketball and hoop. The first child attempts to make a basket. If she makes it, she earns the letter “H” and the next child must imitate the actions of the previous player, while trying to make the same basket. If the child does not make it he earns no letter and the next player gets to try her own creative shot. As a child makes baskets, he adds onto his letters. The first child to get all five letters, spelling “Horse”, wins. The rest can continue until all players get the five letters, or the game can end with the first winner.

Hula Contortion

Divide the class into groups of five to 10 kids. Pass hula hoops out to each group so every child has one, except for each group’s “it”. Have the children stay near their group, but space themselves out so no hula hoop is touching. The kids can hold the hoop anyway they like, as long as it is waist-level or lower. After everyone is in position, the kids must freeze. You blow a whistle, and “it” must go through each hoop in his group using different motions, like jumping, crawling or high-stepping. The first group to get their “it” through all of his hoops wins. This also works as a timed game. Any group who completes the task within a certain amount of minutes gets to try it again. The groups that don't complete the hula-hoop course on time are out of the game.

About the Author

Jennifer Erchul has been a freelance writer since 2002. Writing primarily about family and travel, her work has appeared in the "Idaho State Journal," "Portnuef Valley Parents Magazine" and "Western Flyfisher." She writes for numerous websites and is a published author. Erchul studied English and psychology at Concordia College in Moorhead, Minn.