Cup Stacking Game Rules

By Krystal Wascher
Cup stacking has become a popular sport.

Cup stacking is a popular game with children and adults of all ages. The game involves stacking small cups on top of each other in various patterns and taking them back down as quickly as possible. Cup stacking has an official organization, the World Sport Stacking Association (WSSA), which hosts events and competitions. The WSSA has also sets the official rules that govern the sport of cup stacking.

3-3-3 Stacks

A “3-3-3 stack” is a specific cup configuration that consists of creating three stacks of cups. Each individual stack must also contain three cups. All three stacks must be created before a competitor can begin “breaking down” or “down stacking” her cups.

3-6-3 Stacks

A “3-6-3 stack” is a specific cup configuration that consists of creating three stacks of cups. In this configuration, the two outermost stacks must contain three cups and the center stack must contain six. All stacks must be set up or “up stacked” before a competitor can begin “breaking down” or “down stacking” the configuration.

Game Playing Surface

The official game surface used in WSSA competitions is the “Stackmat.” A Stackmat is a blue rectangular foam mat that has a timer incorporated into the design. Competitors can activate the mat’s timer by pressing on and lifting their hands from the mat. Once the competitor completes the specified number of cup configurations required for a match, he presses the timer once again to stop it.

Age Categories

During official WSSA sponsored tournaments, competitors must compete within an age group. Groups range from age 4 through 19 years of age. In doubles teams, the stackers compete in the age division of the oldest stacker. Age division placement is based on the stacker's age on the final day of competition in a tournament.

About the Author

Krystal Wascher has been writing online content since 2008. She received her Bachelor of Arts in political science and philosophy from Thiel College and a Juris Doctor from Duquesne University School of Law. She was admitted to the Pennsylvania Bar in 2009.