How to Convert a Janome Embroidery Pattern to VP3

By Dee Shneiderman
plastron bigouden image by Chris29 from Fotolia.com

Artisans have used hand-embroidery for centuries to decorate textiles. During the last century, textile manufacturers developed embroidery machines to automate enhancement of their products. Today’s technology allows home sewing enthusiasts to automate their own embroidered projects. Machine embroidery can be performed using any standard sewing machine with a zigzag stitch, but newer machines specialize in embroidery. These operate with user-loaded software that executes stitches in a pre-defined pattern. Each manufacturer uses a specific software format, including “JEF” (Janome embroidery machines) and “VP3” (Pfaff and Viking/Husqvarna machines.) To convert one format to another requires specialized conversion software available for purchase on the web and installed on the user’s computer.

Acquiring the Software

Step 1

Navigate to S&S Computing: Sew-What Pro.

Step 2

Scroll down to the middle of the page. Select the appropriate file for your computer’s operating system, either 32-bit or 64-bit. Click on the appropriate link and download the “Demo” software to your computer’s desktop.

Step 3

Double-click the software’s “SewWhat-Pro32_DEMO” file. The software will install on your computer.

Using the Software to Convert a File

Step 1

Click “File,” “Open” and select a folder and a file from your computer.

Step 2

Click the file and click “Open” to open the file into the SewWhat workspace. The software also allows you to make changes in the design, choosing different colors and other changes.

Step 3

Click on “File” and “Save As.” Click on the “Save as type” drop-down menu. Choose “Viking SE [*.vp3]” and click “Save.”

About the Author

Dee Shneiderman, former librarian and paralegal, has been writing for 40+ years. Published in Compute! Magazine, she helped found The Crescent Review literary magazine. Owner of Frugal-Foto Photography, she holds a Bachelor of Arts in English, a Master of Library Science and a North Carolina Truck Driver Training certificate.