How to Clean Fox Fur

By Matt Scheer
Fur coats must be professionally cleaned and stored to maintain their integrity.

Fox fur is usually in the form of a mounted pelt, a garment or on the back of a taxidermied animal. Cleaning the fur varies slightly by case and condition. The older the fur, the more delicately you have to handle it, and shaking out the fur to get rid of dust and other particulates isn't an option. Because many fox furs are relatively long-haired, they are particularly susceptible to collecting dust.

Spot clean a stain at once with a cleaning solution and rag. Pat the area with the rag rather than stroking to avoid removing guard hairs. Hang the coat to dry after the stain is removed.

Place the coat on an ironing board and gently stroke the fur with a rag soaked in cleaning solution. Only stroke in the direction of the hair, or you may remove hairs needlessly. If you have a pelt, hold it by the butt while you clean it. Hang both to dry, but for a taxidermied fox, use a hair blower but do not hold it within 6 inches of the fur.

Bring back the shine of the fur by drying oat bran or cornmeal and laying it in the fur. These substances soak up dirt and grime. Comb out the cornmeal and bran and shake the coat or belt gently to loosen the rest of the substances.

Take the fur to a professional furrier if you fail to remove a stain. The furrier puts the coat through a sawdust treatment similar to the cornmeal and bran method. Next the fox fur is steamed and glazed, a process that separates and volumizes the hairs.

About the Author

Matt Scheer began writing professionally in 2005. His work has appeared in "The Daily Texan" and "The New York Tribune." Scheer holds a B.A. in English and a B.A. in history, both from the University of Texas. He is also a certified Yoga teacher and Web designer.