Card Game Rules for Seven Card Rummy

By Chris Moore
Rummy, a standard 52-card deck
playing cards image by Warren Millar from <a href='http://www.fotolia.com'>Fotolia.com</a>

In the game of Rummy, each player is dealt seven cards when there are three or four players in the game

Dealing and Piles

The dealer deals each player seven cards one at a time and then places one card face-down on the table. This card begins the discard pile. The remaining deck is placed face-down on the table next to the first discard; this is called the Stock, which is where players primarily draw cards from. If the stock runs out of cards during the game, the discard pile is flipped over and becomes the stock; players may choose to shuffle this pile first.

Play

Play begins with the player to the dealer&#039;s left and continues clockwise with the other one or two players. On a turn, a player first draws one card from the top of the stock or the discard pile. The player ends the turn by sending one card in his hand to the discard pile. In between, the player can get rid of cards by forming melds or laying off cards as described below. A player can therefore have no more than eight cards in the hand during a turn and no more than seven outside the turn.

Melds

Melds consist of at least three cards that are in numerical order and the same suit (called a run) or are all the same value (called a book). There can naturally be no more than four cards in a book. A player who forms a meld can choose to set the meld on the table, discarding it from his hand. A player can also "lay off" cards, adding a card from the hand to a meld if it fits in sequence. A player can only discard one meld on a turn but can lay off any number of cards.

Scoring

Once one player "goes out" by melding, laying off or discarding all cards, the other players total up the points in their cards, and the player who went out gets those points. Number cards are worth their printed value, and face cards are worth 10 points. Normally, the Ace is low and is worth one point; if the players choose to make Aces high, they are worth 15 points.

About the Author

Chris Moore has been contributing to eHow since 2007 and is a member of the DFW Writers' Workshop. He received a Bachelor of Arts in journalism from the University of Texas-Arlington.