How to Build Free Standing Bicycle Racks

By Adam Butler Ducote
Free Standing
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Storing multiple bicycles can be a real challenge in some houses and apartments, and you don't always have the option of drilling holes in the walls and ceiling to hang them. Build a free-standing wooden bicycle rack in only a few hours with a minimal investment in materials.

The Base

Step 1

Arrange two 2-foot pieces of 2-by-4 and two 1 1/2-foot pieces of 2-by-4 into a rectangle. Stand the pieces up on their narrow (2-inch) sides.

Step 2

Place the 1 1/2-foot pieces between the 2-foot pieces. The 2-foot pieces should form the outside edges of the rectangle.

Step 3

Fasten the rectangle together by screwing two screws into each of the four corners. You should now have a wooden rectangle that is 2 feet long by 1 3/4 feet wide and 3 1/2 inches tall.

The Frame

Step 1

Arrange two 4-foot pieces of 2-by-4 and one 1 1/2-foot piece of 2-by-4 as if you are going to make a rectangle again but with three sides. Stand the pieces up on their narrow (2-inch) sides.

Step 2

Place the 1 1/2-foot piece on the end of (not in between) the 4-foot pieces.

Step 3

Fasten the wood together by screwing two screws into the two corners. You should now have a three-sided shape that is 4 feet and 1 1/2 inches long by 1 1/2 feet wide.

The Arms

Step 1

Cut a 1-inch-deep, triangular notch into the two 1-foot pieces of 2-by-4 approximately 3 inches from the end of each piece by making two 45-degree cuts into the narrow (2-inch) side.

Step 2

Smooth or round out the notch with sandpaper. The bike frame will rest in this notch.

Step 3

Cut off the opposite corner on the same end as the notch to narrow the tip of the arm. This will ensure that the arm fits between the top tube and the down tube of your frame.

Assembly

Step 1

Lay the frame down on the ground. Stand the arms up in the corner of the frame with the 4-inch side flat to the 4-foot pieces. Make sure that the notches will be facing up when the frame is standing up with the open end down.

Step 2

Fasten them into place by screwing two screws in from the outside of the frame and two screws in from the inside of the arms on each side.

Step 3

Place the base on the ground and make a mark 6 1/2 inches and 3 inches from the end of the 2-foot pieces. Make a mark with your pencil.

Step 4

Stand up the frame inside of the base with the open end to the ground.

Step 5

Line up the frame between the two marks on the base. Use the carpenter's square to make certain that it is straight.

Step 6

Fasten it in place by screwing two screws into the outside of the base and two screws from the inside of the frame on each side.

About the Author

Adam Butler Ducote studied journalism, photography, and politics at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He was a contributing writer and editor for the 2008 UCSC Disorientation Guide, and worked on various projects with City on a Hill Press. He is also a photographer and he produces documentary audio pieces.