How to Build a Homemade BBQ Trailer

By Jerry Garner
Barbecue is popular in many parts of the United States.

Barbecue is popular in many parts of America. Though there are many restaurants that serve barbecued food, lots of people prefer homemade BBQ. Those who are serious about barbecue are even prepared to take their cooking on the road, to sporting events or competition venues. This is often done by making a BBQ trailer, which can be taken anywhere. BBQ trailers have come in an array of shapes and sizes with varied options that allow the trailers to be customized just about any way imaginable.

Select a design for your BBQ trailer and obtain blueprints that detail the construction specifications. Plans for BBQ trailers can be obtained online. Purchase a design that fits your style of cooking, or you can look at professional BBQ trailers to get design cues from established brands.

Purchase a trailer to serve as the base. A standard 5-foot by 8-foot trailer makes an ideal platform for a homemade BBQ trailer. If you want to include extra grills or smokers, you might need a larger trailer to fit the additional accessories.

Place the BBQ unit on the trailer and secure it into position. The two primary options are to bolt the unit to the trailer or to weld it. Bolt the BBQ unit by sliding bolts through the bolt holes in the BBQ legs, then attaching a washer and nut to the opposite end, below the trailer. Welding is a more permanent solution that requires the use of welding equipment to bond the BBQ unit to the trailer. After securing the unit to the trailer, affix the accessories in the place where you want them to be.

Check the chimneys and smoke box to make sure they are attached correctly to prevent smoke buildup when the BBQ unit is in use.

Attach storage compartments to hold utensils, wood and charcoal you expect to use. Furnish the trailer with cutlery and any other kitchen items you need.

Tip

Give your BBQ trailer a test run at home before taking it out on the road. This will help you identify and fix any problems that may not be immediately visible to the naked eye, such as minor adjustments to the chimney position.

About the Author

Jerry Garner has been writing semi-professionally for more than 15 years. The body of Garner's work includes informative articles, news and current events and historical essays. He is an avid sports fan and frequently writes about outdoor activities online.