How to Build a Corn Hole Game Scoreboard

By Steve Silverman

The game of Corn Hole--also known as Bags or Baggo depending on the part of the country in which the game is being played--is generally considered one of the most popular sports when tailgating. When you are Corn Holing, you and your competitor both have four bean bags. The idea is to toss the bean bags at a target 25 feet away. There is a circle on the board; if you throw the bag through the circle, you get three points. If you land on the board, you get one point. You need 21 points to win, but you may not go over the total. A Corn Hole player who throws a bull's-eye when he has 20 points goes back to zero points. You can keep score on your homemade scoreboard.

Nail a piece of plywood that is four feet long by two feet wide to a 10-inch 2 x 4. Attach the 2 x 4 to a 12-inch piece of plywood that serves as the base.

Paint half the scoreboard blue and the other half red. In the game of Corn Hole, one player throws blue bean bags and the other throws red. That's why the scoreboard is divided that way. Paint your family name in black across the top of the scoreboard so everyone knows it's your family's game. Your name should go across both sides of the scoreboard.

Nail in two plastic score sleeves on each side of the scoreboard. Once you have done this, you can keep an accurate score of your Corn Hole game as it progresses. If you throw one bag on the board and one through the hole on your first round and your opponent throws three on the board in the first round, put up a score of 4 for your round and 3 for his.

Continue to change the score after each round. Once either player has scored double digits, you use both sleeves on your half of the board to note a score of 10 or more.

Bring your scoreboard inside after you finish playing. If you leave it outside in the rain, the board can warp.

About the Author

Steve Silverman is an award-winning writer, covering sports since 1980. Silverman authored The Minnesota Vikings: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly and Who's Better, Who's Best in Football -- The Top 60 Players of All-Time, among others, and placed in the Pro Football Writers of America awards three times. Silverman holds a Master of Science in journalism from the Medill School of Journalism.