Biggest Loser Rules & Regulations

By Elizabeth Smith

"The Biggest Loser" is a television show airing on NBC that pits contestants against each other to see who can lose the most weight. The overweight players are placed on teams with trainers who use different motivational styles, and they live and train together. Each week, one team member is sent home. At the end of the show, after an at-home period, the contestant who has lost the greatest percentage of weight wins the grand prize.

History

"The Biggest Loser" first aired in 2004 and was an instant hit. Several seasons have featured individual contestants, while others have grouped together couples and families. The show is currently recruiting players for its next season, which will again be pairs of family members.

Basic Rules

To be a contestant on "The Biggest Loser," applicants must be at least 18, a legal citizen of the United States, and agree to release NBC and its affiliates from liability related to activities they undertake during filming. In addition, applicants agree to release their personal information for use on the show.

Release of Likeness

Applicants must agree to allow their image, audio recordings, voice, video footage and all application information to be used. The show also reserves the right to modify applicants' images and edit all video footage as they wish.

Personal Information

Candidates must also consent to allow the show and its affiliates to check their backgrounds, credit reports, employer information, reference information and any other items in a person's personal history. By signing the release form, the contestant must agree to allow any member of NBC and its affiliates to collect information about any written or spoken statement in regard to application information and grants them the right to obtain it from friends, family, employers and virtually any other source.

New Season

For the new season, contestants from the same family must apply in pairs. They may be in the form of parent/child, siblings, married couples, cousins or in-laws.

About the Author

Elizabeth Smith has been a scientific and engineering writer since 2004. Her work has appeared in numerous journals, newspapers and corporate publications. A frequent traveler, she also has penned articles as a travel writer. Smith has a Bachelor of Arts in communications and writing from Michigan State University.